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Note from Barb: Thanks so much to Wendy Lou Jones for guest hosting the blog today! But first… a postcard for Wendy:

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Dear Wendy:

So far on my own holiday, I fell for a tall, dark, and long-nosed fellow.  But our love was doomed when he left me for a taller, darker, and much worse-smelling stranger.

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I had a brief but intense fling with another even taller, longer-nosed and not quite so smelly guy  but our holiday passion burned out by the time we reached the entrance to Amber Fort in Jaipur.

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Maybe I should consider going to Wales with Wendy next holiday?


Why Writers Love Holidays

–Guest post by Wendy Lou Jones

 

Writer Wendy Lou Jones says, "My name is Wendy Lou Jones. I was born and raised in West Sussex, England and moved to Birmingham to study Medicine at University, where I was lucky enough to meet my husband. We now live in a little village in Herefordshire with our two grubby boys. I discovered a love of writing not long after my youngest son started school. And if you were to ask me what it was that made me make the switch, I’d tell you quite simply, that it started with a dream."

Writer Wendy Lou Jones says, “My name is Wendy Lou Jones. I was born and raised in West Sussex, England and moved to Birmingham to study Medicine at University, where I was lucky enough to meet my husband. We now live in a little village in Herefordshire with our two grubby boys. I discovered a love of writing not long after my youngest son started school. And if you were to ask me what it was that made me make the switch, I’d tell you quite simply, that it started with a dream.”

When Barb told me she was going on holiday and needed to find ‘cover’ she got me thinking. Now my own holidays are nothing extraordinary to write about; family fun in Devon or Cornwall, something like that, but in stories … now that’s a different matter.

In stories, holidays can play a crucial role. Think about it. Why would anyone go on holiday in a story, particularly romantic stories? It’s usually for one of two reasons.

If the escape is to some exotic island, a mysterious and handsome man could show up. You get all the wonder of the new setting to explore without any job or real life getting in the way, and then there’s the heat and the exposed flesh (not found in a wet week in North Wales, I can assure you!) and all the wonderful holiday adventure that evolves. I have a series I’ve enjoyed immensely I’m thinking of here: the Desert Kings books by Diana Fraser – wonderfully exotic sheikh romance. After that, you could think the drama was over, but what about the parting and return to home at the end? Major drama! Or maybe not the end. That exotic chap might give up all the wonderful things he has over there just to be with your heroine in her damp flat in Sheffield – Romance plus plus plus!

But there are the other stories where the holiday is the pause, or the fly in the ointment that either ruins what we think was the plan, or prevents the reunion we were hoping for and draws out the drama, making us yell at the page, ‘He’s not there. No, don’t go; he will be back. No, don’t get off with his best mate; he does love you; he’s just had to go away for a while.’ I can’t give an example of this as it would spoil the surprise, but you know who you are!

Oh, I’m exhausted just thinking about it.

So, holidays can be VERY important to romantic stories and I’m sure they play their part in other genres too. I Hope Barb is having a more relaxing time. Thanks for having me on, Barb and send us a postcard!


Don’t miss Wendy’s books. They make great vacation reads

‘One Stop’ Buy links:

Website/Blog  | Twitter | Facebook | Harper Impulse


 

imageThe Summer We Loved

Publication date: 20/08/2015

Dr Peter Florin is the sexy bad boy of St Steven’s hospital. Despite his love ‘em and leave ‘em attitude, every woman still wants him – and nurse Jenny White is no exception. For one night she thought she saw the real Pete, but ever since then he’s kept his distance and so she has kept hers…

Only Pete is a man haunted by a dark childhood and a tragic loss, and as she watches him spiral down into despair, Jenny realises she might be the only one who can drag him back. So she does – at the risk of her own, already bruised and battered heart. For no matter what she tells herself, such a man is surely impossible to change – and even more impossible to resist.


Do you have a favorite holiday-themed book?

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